International Transport Forum - 2014 annual summit Transport for a Changing World | 21-23 may 2014 - Leipsig, Germany | France presidency

Media Travel Programme: Meet the 2015 Participants

Every year, the International Transport Forum, through its Media Travel Programme, invites up to 35 non-European journalists to attend the Annual Summit. For the participants, the Media Travel Programme provides deep immersion into the issues that drive mobility policy for the 21st century. It is a unique opportunity to listen to, meet and interact with key decision-makers from government, business and academia. Below the participants offer their take on changes in transport and the Leipzig Summit.

 

 

 

 

 

Meirav Moran
Globes
Israel
Twitter: @MeiravMoran

Meirav Moran has been an editor at "Globes", Israel's largest financial newspaper, for the past 9 years. She is Deputy Editor of Globes' real-estate magazine and also the "City critic" of the newspaper, covering the subject of urbanisation. She writes the "the Smarter city" column, which features projects, applications and special events in this particular field. Moran has also initiated a media project called "Talk of the Town", which is part of the weekly magazine. In this project, Globes hosts key figures in leading cities around the world, and writes about the development challenges facing each city.     

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Describe your vision for your country’s transport future?
On the urban level, the challenge for decision makers of municipalities and the business community is to develop the best way to connect between personal shared vehicles and mass transportation, that will be beneficial to the city, will not demand to much of the state's budget, and will be attractive to all of us - the users of the city – residents, visitors, and tourists.

אותה כמות נסיעות - רק עם 10% מכלי הרכב

[Same amount of travel using only 10% of vehicles]
Globes (Israel) | 09 June 2015

 

 

 

Grant Bradley
The New Zealand Herald
New Zealand
Twitter: @gbradleynz

 

Grant Bradley has been on the news desk of the Business Herald for the past seven years covering aviation, tourism and energy. Grant has been a journalist for the last 25 years working mainly in New Zealand. He has worked for the New Zealand Herald newspaper and the paper's website, nzherald.co.nz, for most of that time in general reporting and news desk roles.

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What are the challenges facing transport in your country?Main urban area road congestion, funding for public transport, encouraging green alternatives to existing transport, attracting more airlines to service this country which is remote from many of our main markets.

What transport initiatives/projects in your country would you like to share?

  • Air links. Almost all visitors to New Zealand arrive by air and these links are also improving as a result of more government to government air services agreements and efforts by tourism and other agencies such as airports to attract more carriers. Improved air links are also important for moving increasing volumes of high value freight, particularly fresh produce from this country.
  • The expanding cycle trail network. Work on the tourist cycle trails got underway as the global financial crisis was starting to bite. The network was envisaged as a way of providing jobs and attracting tourists to regional areas and has proved a big draw for overseas and domestic tourists.  There have been matching efforts in cities with an extensive cycle network being built in Auckland, NZ's largest city. 

What should policy makers focus on, in your country/globally?
Having a sensible debate about how roads and public transport can be funded in the future. Preparing for the surge in the number of electric vehicles.

 

Flight check: Abu Dhabi to Sydney
The New Zealand Herald | 16 July 2015

 

 

 

Prajakta Chavan Rane
Hindustan Times
India
 

Prajakta Chavan Rane is a senior reporter with Hindustan Times. Her reporting experience with this paper and also with DNA has given her exposure to different beats, including politics, real estate, reporting on civic life, assembly polls, right to information act and consumer affairs.  She also covers transport which is a crucial topic affecting day to day life of the citizens.

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What are the challenges facing transport in your country?
I come from the most populous city in India‘Mumbai which has numerous transportation challenges. Traffic jams is regular phenomena on the city roads. I admit our public transport is in pathetic state but even private transport owners have their set of problems, which includes bad roads, traffic jams, lack of parking and road toll which was one of the main election agenda taken up by the various political parties in the recently held state assembly elections. 
The growing number of private vehicles on the road network which has not grown over the last decade is also a problem.

Describe your vision for your country’s transport future?
Like Mumbai even other metros in the country have itheir own share of transportation problems. Though there are several problems in the country still there is some hope. The Indian Government especially Indian railways are investing heavily in the infrastructure and rail connectivity to ports, this will serve the citizens in long term. I suppose only if we maintain our focus on enhancing public transport like bus rapid transit system, more railways and car-pooling we will soon start seeing the difference.

What should policy makers focus on, in your country/globally?
India and Mumbai particularly faces severe space crunch and therefore more insistence should be on enhancing the public transport and discouraging use of private transport. Besides, apart from looking at road construction the focus should be exploring the water transport mode. Mumbai has a huge coastal line which should be utilised to provide connectivity to other nearby regions. More focus should be on spreading the railway network instead of only roads and highways. 

 

 

 

Camilla Cornell
National Post
Canada
LinkedIn: https://ca.linkedin.com/pub/camilla-cornell/31/327/98

Camilla Cornell is a freelance journalist who writes for top national magazines and newspapers in Canada, including: the National Post, More, Reader's Digest, Today's Parent, Canadian Family, MoneySense, Canadian Capital, Profit.

The subject areas she covers include personal finance, travel, health and relationships.

Camilla has won two National Magazine Awards (Gold and Silver) and one Rogers Award for Editorial Excellence.

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What are the challenges facing transport in your country?
In Canada, winter storms can play havoc with flights and the increasing tendency for airlines to overbook sometimes results in unreasonable delays for passengers. The tendency for airlines to squeeze more passengers in less space is troublesome for both business and leisure travelers.

Describe your vision for your country’s transport future?
I’d like to see airlines clearly spell out their obligations to passengers in the event of cancellations and delays. The passenger rights movement in Canada is not as robust as in Europe or even the U.S.

 

What should policy makers focus on, in your country/globally?
Definitely a stronger emphasis on passenger rights. Better planning for winter storms, which are only worsened by global warming.

 

 

 

 

A. Elizabeth Sunimalee Dias
Sunday Times  Sri Lanka 
Twitter: @Sunimalee

Elizabeth Dias is currently a Senior Journalist for the Business section of the Sunday Times in Sri Lanka. She has been working at the Wijeya Newspapers, a leading newspaper group, since 2000, covering tourism, travel and aviation beats. She has had  assignments in IT, Aviation, Tourism, peace negotiations between the Tamil Tiger rebels and the government in 2002 in addition to working for the Business section of the Daily Mirror and Daily Financial Times newspapers reporting from India, Thailand, Qatar, Malaysia, Singapore, China, Japan, Germany, Maldives, Vietnam and Lebanon.

Elizabeth started out as a freelance radio presenter and news reader at the state radio station, Sri Lanka Broadcasting Corporation (SLBC) and later joined the Sri Lanka Rupavahini Corporation (SLRC) in 2002 as a news presenter on the nine o’clock news. She has a bachelor’s degree in Social Sciences from the Open University of Sri Lanka (OUSL) in 2002, completed a Masters in Conflict Resolution at the University of Colombo in 2010. 

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What are the challenges facing transport in your country?
Sri Lanka faces issues relating to a limited number of transport modes and service options compared to the number of users. There are more people travelling by bus or train to work that has led to a high incidence of people falling prey to increased congestion inside the available public transport services. Moreover, the increased number of imported vehicles has also contributed to intense traffic during peak hours.   

What transport initiatives/projects in your country would you like to share?
Sri Lanka is looking at a metro network of transport services in addition to having road travel for buses increasingly streamlined in a bid to ensure that buses would ply on a different lane from the rest of the traffic.

 

What should policy makers focus on, in your country/globally?
Convenience, safety and timely transport services in much faster speeds with increased infrastructure for road development and rail services is what's required in Sri Lanka.Globally there is a need to increase both parking spaces and infrastructure for roads to cater to the growing numbers. 

 

 

 

 

Dania El Saadi
The National  
United Arab Emirates
 

Dania El Saadi is general business reporter at the National newspaper in the UAE.  She has been a reporter for 15 years working for newspapers, newswires and magazines. She has worked for the Daily Star newspaper in Lebanon covering general business stories and in Dubai at Bloomberg New covering all aspects of the energy sector. Other assignments included covering Arab economies and stocks in Cairo and working  for Reuters covering Qatar news and covering Kuwait news for Dow Jones. 

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What are the challenges facing transport in your country?
In the UAE, my country of residence, the main challenge is dealing with congestion, which is becoming  a major problem due to population growth. A new problem is the conflict between national airlines Etihad Airways and Emirates with European and US airlines over competition. US airlines are calling for the cancelation of open skies agreements with the UAE in order to stem competition from the UAE carriers.  Another challenge UAE carriers have to face is meeting rising demand for travel in the UAE while at the same time expanding airports.

What transport initiatives/projects in your country would you like to share?
The government is trying to deal with the problem of road congestion by expanding the metro and bus networks. They have an impressive plan to expand one of two existing metro lines to cater to the expected 24 million visitors to Dubai’s Expo 2020. They are also expanding one of the airports, Dubai World Central, to receive 160 million passengers by the 2020s. They are also expanding roads and building new bridges to help ease congestion.

 

 

 

 

Joy Fang Zhiwen
Today
Singapore
 

Joy  Fang Zhiwen is a senior reporter at Today. She focuses mainly on transport, housing and consumer beats. Joy has produced several news stories and features, such as on how third-party taxi booking apps could fragment the driver pool, the new bus contracting model and new initiatives by the Land Transport Authority. She has won News Story of the Month four times in the monthly internal Today awards.  Another areas of interest is in animal welfare.

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What are the challenges facing transport in your country?Singapore faces issues such as high commuter traffic which flows in one direction during peak hours provoking congestion, high costs in purchasing cars, and an ageing rail system which has led to several high profile disruptions affecting hundreds of thousands of commuters. Commuters are becoming increasingly disgruntled and sensitive, reacting negatively to fare increases or transport operators’ efforts to diversify into other forms of businesses.

 

Describe your vision for your country’s transport future?
A seamless transport system that allows travel with ease. For instance more sheltered walkways (air-conditioned tunnels connecting bus stops to train stations), waiting times of less than 5 minutes for buses and trains at any hour, autonomous vehicles or other forms of mobility such as segways to help ease connections between nodes.

 

What should policy makers focus on, in your country/globally?
Keeping all forms of transport (including cars, bike rentals, motorcycles, taxis and trains) affordable, making sure the public system is well oiled and well maintained. Have more alternatives for commuters, instead of just buses and trains. They should also work on new ways to combat congestion on roads, given that our ERP system is not fully effective (some complain that they pay the congestion fee and yet it is still as jammed as ever).

 

 

 

Michael Forbes
The Dominion Post
New Zealand

 

Michael Forbes is a journalist with The Dominion Post. He has covered the transport and regional council rounds since 2012, reporting on a variety of local and national issues, including the development and construction of the Government’s four-lane expressway through the Wellington region, and plans to extend Wellington International Airport’s runway by 300 metres. He has also covered developments in national road safety, including new breath-alcohol limits and licence requirements for drivers, as well as proposals to both raise and lower open road speed limits.

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What are the challenges facing transport in your country?
New Zealand’s geographic isolation from its major trading partners means it needs to work hard to promote itself as an attractive destination for air and shipping lines, and an efficient domestic freight network is key to that success. Transport demands are also likely to change significantly over the next few decades given the country’s aging population and multiple trends that point towards declining private vehicle use, such as less young people obtaining driver licenses.

What transport initiatives/projects in your country would you like to share?
New Zealand’s rugged terrain and poorly-designed highways in many areas, coupled with a vehicle fleet that is old by world standards, means it lags behind many developed countries in road safety. In 2010 the Government launched its 10-year Safer Journeys Strategy, which was designed to reduce death and serious injuries on our roads by attacking the problem from a multiple angles. Since its inception, the blood-alcohol limit for driving has been reduced, tougher driver licence tests have been introduced and police have taken a harsher line with speeding. In 2013, the national road toll of 254 deaths was the lowest since 1950.

What should policy-makers focus on, in your country/globally?
As an island nation in the Pacific, New Zealand is vulnerable to the cost and disruptions caused by extreme weather events. About 18 per cent of the country’s greenhouse gas emissions come from transport and measures to reduce this to date have had little impact. New Zealand’s policy makers, along with those elsewhere, need to come up with workable solutions to this problem.

Government says it will take the 'lightest touch' possible to regulating Uber
stuff.co.nz | 06 June 2015

Simon Bridges hoping to attract more electric and driverless cars to NZ
The Southland Times  | 22 May 2015

 

 

 

 

Yonah Freemark
The Transport Politic
USA
Twitter: @yfreemark

 

Yonah Freemark is a journalist and city planner who founded the website The Transport Politic and who has written on issues relating to transportation and urban affairs for CNN, The New York Times, CityLab, Next City, and others. He manages work on transportation and transit-oriented development for Chicago’s Metropolitan Planning Council and is an adjunct professor at Roosevelt University. 

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What are the challenges facing transport in your country?
For thirty years, the U.S. has been underinvesting in its transportation systems. The results are obvious to any visitor: Poorly maintained roads, decrepit transit systems, and an embarrassing intercity rail network. Without additional public funding dedicated to transportation infrastructure, these problems will worsen, but the political support for that funding is limited.

What transport initiatives/projects in your country would you like to share?
The intercity rail projects being pursued by California and Florida are dramatically different but both would significantly improve rail mobility in these major states. California’s project, much like European antecedents, is publicly funded and will produce 350 kph trains operating between San Francisco and Los Angeles, but questions remain about whether it will be fully funded or just partially built. Florida’s project, on the other hand, is using private funds to connect Miami and Orlando at much lower 180 kph speeds. The outcomes of both projects could profoundly influence future rail investments in the U.S.

What should policy makers focus on, in your country/globally?
Given climate change and transportation’s enormous contribution to greenhouse gas emissions, it is imperative that investment in transportation be altered dramatically. Notably, despite the well-understood connection between transportation and land use, policy makers in the U.S. continue to support transportation investments that worsen climate change by encouraging lifestyles in sprawling, energy-inefficient environments. We must alter our approach immediately to address the climate challenge head-on.

For rail services, downtown sometimes isn’t the right place for a terminus
IThe Transport Politic  (USA)  | 06 July 2015

Will autonomous cars change the role and value of public transportation?
IThe Transport Politic  (USA)  | 23 June 2015

 

 

 

Dhanusha Gokulan
Khaleej Times
United Arab Emirates

LinkedIn: https://ae.linkedin.com/pub/dhanusha-gokulan/a/631/587
Twitter: @wordjunkie88

An Indian national and a journalist since 2008, Dhanusha is the resident transport expert at Khaleej Times, Dubai, United Arab Emirates. She has covered a wide range of topics and issues, such as education, civic problems, health, youth, real estate, and culture, Dhanusha finally settled on transport and infrastructure as a beat in 2013, choosing it for its dynamism and diversity. A prolific writer Dhanusha has worked in/with several news organisations in both India and UAE.   

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What are the challenges facing transport in your country?
Globally, UAE is one of the fastest developing countries. Even though giant leaps have been made to make UAE a regional hub for international trade, metropolitan transport suffers due to limited availability of public transport and a heavy focus on automobile travel. The three key transportation challenges in UAE are:

  • Proper integration of all means of public transport like buses, trains, water taxis, and taxis
  • Lack of bicycling and walking tracks. (Not always possible due to extreme weather conditions)
  • Narrow exit ways on highways causing severe road blocks during peak traffic hours.

Describe your vision for your country’s transport future?
To achieve smart transportation goals, the UAE needs to invest in high-density, circular and compact communities, taking inspiration from ancient times, which will inevitably give rise to:

  • Cheaper and more environment friendly modes of transportation;
  • Higher dependence on public ;transportation and smart and dynamic highways;
  • Bicycles becoming primary mode of short-distance transport, hereby encouraging healthy lifestyles among people.

What transport initiatives/projects in your country would you like to share?
The Dubai Tram, which was launched in November 2014; the Dubai Metro, launched in 2009, and the Etihad Rail Project, which is still undergoing.

 

 

 

Gulam Ali  Khan
Muscat Daily
Oman

Twitter: @GAliKhan1

Gulam Ali Khan has been a senior business reporter with Muscat Daily, the leading English daily in Sultanate of Oman, since May 2010. He has extensively covered the transport and logistics infrastructure developments in the Gulf region including Oman's ambitious national railway project and expansion of airports. As a seasoned journalist he has also been covering wide ranging economic issues, oil and gas industry and financial markets. He has covered international conferences on transport, oil and gas industry and economy in the Gulf region including IATA's 2014 World Air Transport Summit in Doha, Qatar.

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Describe your vision for your country’s transport future?
Oman has made heavy investments to develop transport and logistic infrastructure in past few years. With rapid development of ports and national railway project linking to the neighbouring countries, Oman, in the coming years, is going to serve as the gateway for international trade in the Middle East and Africa.

With new ports capacities being developed and national railway project to link Oman with the neighbouring countries, the movement of goods and people between Gulf countries will be much fast and easier in next few years. 

What transport initiatives/projects in your country would you like to share?
The most ambitious transport project in Oman is the National Railway Project which will link major cities, ports and towns within Oman and with other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries.

The expansion of two international airports is in the final phase of development that will significantly boost the country's capacity to accommodate more international passengers.

What should policy makers focus on, in your country/globally?
With the development of infrastructures the major focus should be on interconnecting the transport infrastructures among neighbouring/regional countries. Oman is doing a great work by linking its infrastructures (through roads and railway) with the neighbouring countries. However, there is a need to develop and improve the quality of public transport services and the government is considering setting up a new public transport system in Muscat.

 

 

 

Sang-Soo Kwon 
Korea JoongAng Daily  
Korea  
 

Sang-Soo Kwon has been working at the Korea JoongAng Daily since June 2011 and works on the National Desk to cover politics and social affairs. He started his career as a business reporter to cover car and manufacturing industries.

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What are the challenges facing transport in your country?
Korean automakers have been challenged by foreign automakers, particularly by German automakers such as BMW, Mercedes Benz, Audi and Volkswagen, in the domestic market. The market share for foreigners marked nearly 15 percent in 2014 while the combined market share for the nation’s leading automakers - Hyundai and Kia - fell below 70 percent. Korean automakers also are having a tough time in the global market as their core markets including Brazil, Russia and other newly industrialised nations are experiencing  a slump in their economies.

Describe your vision for your country’s transport future?
Koreans need to focus on next-generation cars including smart cars converged with IT and eco-friendly cars. One thing that industry insiders are carefully watching is Hyundai Motor’s recent aggressive investments in high end car technology including the driverless driving system because this will  impact the overall industry including the parts industry.

What should policy makers focus on, in your country/globally?
The Korean government has been consistently saying that the country should improve its overall infrastructure for environmentally-friendly vehicles, but it hasn’t improved that much. The subsidies for electric vehicle buyers have been cut down and not so many charging stations were built in the past few years. 

 

 

Ayoub  Lahrache
Groupe Maroc Soir
Morocco
Twitter: @AyoubLahrache

 

Ayoub  Lahrache has been a journalist at Le Matin since January 2013. He started his career as a web editor, but swiftly became a journalist working on  the national desk. He trained as a journalist at l’Ecole Supérieure de Journalisme et de Communication (ESJC) à Casablanca, and obtained a Masters in journalism.

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Adrian Lim
The Straits Times
Singapore
 

Adrian Lim has been working in the news industry for the past eight years.  He is currently working as correspondent for The Straits Times’ Newsdesk, with an interest in transport-related issues, both public (trains, buses) and private (taxis, cars). He writes on a diverse range of subject matter, from Government policies to industry developments, statistical trends, and sustainable transport options. 
Previous appointments include reporter at My Paper, Singapore Press Holdings,  Lifestyle Editor at AsiaOne, Singapore Press Holdings and Content Producer at AsiaOne.

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What are the challenges facing transport in your country?
Land space is limited in Singapore, and since policy makers cannot keep building new roads to accommodate more cars, the alternative is a reliable and well-connected public transport system. Singapore's rail network is set to double in length by 2030, and while new train lines are being built, older ones which are more than 20 years old have to be kept running smoothly. The recent years have also seen more people using bicycles and other personal mobility devices (PMD), such as electric kick scooters. With more mixed-use traffic on roads and pavements, there needs to be greater mutual understanding between pedestrians, cyclists, motorists and PMD users.

What transport initiatives/projects in your country would you like to share?
New metro lines are being built, which will double the country's rail network by 2030. A new Government Contracting Model for the bus industry is also in the pipelines, modelled after the London system, where the Government owns all the buses and infrastructure, while operators bid to run the routes and meet service standards.

 

What should policy makers focus on, in your country/globally?
Globally, it should be about making transportation - public or private - accessible and friendly to everyone. Transportation helps people travel to find jobs, get to work, access services such as healthcare, and also brings people together, whether for work or social reasons.

 

 

 

Carmen Luna
CNN Expansion
Mexico
LinkedIn: https://mx.linkedin.com/pub/carmen-luna/65/a72/282

Carmen Luna is a financial journalist; she has been working in the media industry since 2008. Currently she works in Mexico City, at CNNExpansión website where she covers sources of macro-economy and financial systems.

Her previous professional experience includes financial analyst and journalist for El Economista journal, and journalist in La Razón journal. Carmen studied Economics at UNAM.

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What are the challenges facing transport in your country?
In Mexico City the strong population growth in urban and suburban zones has been a huge problem for the last 15 years. Both demand for urban transport and the number of cars in circulation has increased considerably because the sources of employment are in urban areas, while the population tends to live in the suburbs. Increased car use has in turn led to poorer air quality.

So, I think that the main challenges facing transport in Mexico are: the lack of sustainable public transport, saturation of roads, number of cars circulating, an outdated subway, lack of road and pedestrian awareness and lack of programs to take the old cars off the road.

What transport initiatives/projects in your country would you like to share?
One of the most successful projects implemented in Mexico City is the so-called Metrobus, which runs on the main roads of the city. It has allowed the Mexican authorities to takeout of service a large number of buses, however the  service level is still somewhat lacking.

What are you best and worst travel experiences?
My best travel experience was in London, especially in the subway. The worst, I live it every day to transport me from my home to my work in underground and then by bus.

 

 

 

 

Laura J.Nelson
Los Angeles Times
United States 
LinkedIn:  http://www.linkedin.com/in/laurajanenelson
Twitter: @laura_nelson

Laura J. Nelson is a staff writer at the Los Angeles Times. She focuses on transport issues in Southern California, including the influence of technology on mobility, the push for more pedestrian- and bicycle-friendly streets, and the rapid expansion of Los Angeles’ rail network.   She is on the board of the California Scholastic Press Association, where she helps to teach and mentor high school journalists. Laura grew up in Kansas and received her bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Southern California.

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What are the challenges facing transport in your country?Money is the biggest concern. The federal fund for highway, road and transit improvements in the U.S. is essentially bankrupt, because it is paid for through a tax on gasoline that has not been raised for more than 20 years. At the same time, vehicles have become more fuel efficient, reducing revenue. National leaders in Congress are, for the most part, not willing to raise taxes because doing so is politically unpopular—but there is no clear idea of where money could come from, instead.

What transport initiatives/projects in your country would you like to share?
As a Los Angeles resident, I’m most interested in what’s happening locally: We currently have five rail lines under construction, an infrastructure push that dwarfs what any other United States city is doing. California is in the early stages of building high-speed rail from San Francisco to Los Angeles, and is considering whether to shift our taxation structure toward the number of miles driven, in addition to a per-gallon fee on gasoline. Across the United States, we’re also seeing a shift toward more pedestrian- and cyclist-friendly urban areas, and growing interest in public-private partnerships, which have been very popular on other continents, but not common here.

What are you best and worst travel experiences?
No travel experience is bad! My most memorable trip was to India, an overwhelming but beautiful country.

 

 

Yusuf Omar
eNews Channel Africa (eNCA)
South Africa

 

Yusuf Omar is a journalist for eNews Channel Africa (eNCA), the country’s only independent 24-hour news channel. He recently covered the Syrian civil war, Zimbabwean elections, and documented the illegal rhino horn trade in Vietnam. At eNCA he has participated in the ‘Building South Africa,’ series and has told stories of the nation’s ageing infrastructure, how it has impacted on the economy, the country’s multi-billion dollar plans to bring reliable public transport, and the provision of free internet, to over 50 million people. Born in England, raised in Australia, educated in America, and now living in South Africa, Omar brings a global perspective to local issues.

After completing his post-graduate media studies at Rhodes University, Omar worked for The Star newspaper in Johannesburg, where he focused on environmental issues. This beat saw him cover the UN’s COP17 meeting on climate change in Durban. 

In 2012, he moved to eNCA, and participated in the ‘Building South Africa,’ series. 

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Jorge Oviedo
La Nacion
Argentina
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/jorge-oviedo/8/363/7
Twitter: @OviedoJorge

Jorge Oviedo is journalist and columnist at La Nación (www.lanacion.com.ar), 
columnist at Semanario Mil30 Radio del Plata saturdays from 7 to 9 and columnist at Claro y Sencillo FM Milenium 106.5 radio

 

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Sinan Öztürk
Daily Sabah
Turkey
LinkedIn:  http://tr.linkedin.com/pub/sinan-öztürk/2a/897/215/en
Twitter: @sinan_ozturk   

Sinan Öztürk has been a web editor at Daily Sabah since 2014, he primarily writes news stories on the business section of our website, which are also often published in the printed version of the paper. Previously, he worked for a customs audit and consultancy company. Sinan is currently doing a master’s degree on International Relations in Galatasaray University, after obtaining a bachelor’s degree in the same field in Bilkent University.   

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What are the challenges facing transport in your country?Turkey’s transport sector is pretty much based on fossil fuels, which are exported from foreign countries. Sea transport is underdeveloped, despite Turkey being surrounded by seas while rail transport, especially for freight, is very limited. The current turmoil in the Middle East, North Africa and Ukraine, and in the Balkans and the Caucasus in the past, have been major challenges for Turkey’s transport sector. Non-tariff barriers from the EU and Iran are also important challenges for Turkey’s transport sector.

Describe your vision for your country’s transport future?
I would like to see Turkey’s transport less dependent on fossil fuels, with much more emphasis on sea and rail transport. Turkey’s role as a logistics hub between Europe, Eurasia, Central Asia, Middle East and North Africa should be further improved with uninterrupted links to these regions.

What transport initiatives/projects in your country would you like to share?
Istanbul’s third airport, which is under construction and to be inaugurated in 2017, will be the largest airport in the world in terms of passenger capacity and will strengthen Turkey’s role as a transit hub.  The Kars–Tbilisi–Baku railway, which was delayed several times, will improve ties between three countries in the Caucasus, while linking Turkey with an alternative route from Central Asian countries to China that manufacturing bases are in a trend to move inland.

 

 

Jekki Bryan Pascual
ABS-CBN News Channel (ANC) 
Philippines
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/jekki-pascual/20/bb8/956
Twitter: @ANCALERTS    

Jekki Pascual is a TV journalist working for a 24-hour English news channel based in Manila, Philippines. He has been working for over 7 years now, writing on various topics ranging from business, international news, politics, features, technology to climate change and many more. Jekki has also worked as a reporter and even as a news anchor. He has also been part of a team doing special documentaries.  He graduated with a Bachelor's degree in Communication from the prestigious Ateneo de Manila University. 

What are the challenges facing transport in your country?
Congestion. That's one word to describe the transportation problem in the Philippines - airport congestion, road congestion, rail congestion. So many people, so little space.

Describe your vision for your country’s transport future?
Commuter friendly nation. The Philippines need to develop transport infrastructure so Filipinos and tourists will find it easier to navigate and travel in and around cities.

What transport initiatives/projects in your country would you like to share?
Jeepneys and tricycles are iconic modes of transportation in the Philippines. Now, many groups and some government agencies are pushing for electric jeepneys or e-jeeps/ e-tricycles to help the environment and commuters as well.

 

 

 

 

Diana Laura Pazos
Clarín Newspaper / Viajes Clarí
Argentina
Twitter: @dianapazos

 

Diana Pazos has been working as a journalist for Clarín, a major newspaper in Argentina, since 2001. She writes articles for the “Suplemento Viajes & Turismo”, the Sunday Travel and Tourism Section of Clarín. And she also works for the website http://www.clarin.com/todoviajes, focusing on travel articles, trends of the tourist market and industry, transport,  technology and gastronomy.

She has also written for several magazines (Buquebus, Avianca, Rumbos, La Primera and Sustainable Development Pymes, among others), newspapers such as El Día de La Plata and Hoy and the Italian press agency ANSA.

She holds a Bachelor's degree in Communication and Media from Universidad Nacional de la Plata (UNLP).

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What are the challenges facing transport in your country?
The challenges are the development and improvement of public transport's efficiency: for instance, people need more trains and better frequency in Argentina, in general, and in Buenos Aires, in particular. And this city also needs more subways because traffic jams are a huge problem.

 

Describe your vision for your country’s transport future?
There are some policies to develop the rail network, to add lanes in highways and to promote the use of bicycles in big cities, such as in Buenos Aires.

 

What are you best and worst travel experiences?
My best travel experiences were with Air New Zealand and with the high speed rail AVE-Renfe in Europe. As regards the worst experiences, I could mention the one I had in El Cairo, Egypt: the traffic was extremely chaotic. Also, in Cuba, ten years ago, I waited for hours for a bus that never showed up.

 

 

 

 

Fabio Eduardo Ramos Murakawa
Valor Economico
Brazil
Twitter: @fabiomura

Fabio Murakawa currently works as a reporter for the international desk of the newspaper Valor Economico, covering macroeconomic and political issues, with emphasis on Countries in South America. He has been professional journalist since 1997 and has worked for some of the major media outlets in Brazil, such as the newspapers Folha de S. Paulo and Agora São Paulo, Universo Online - UOL (news website), R7.com (news website) and Reuters news agency

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Aparajita Ray
The Times of India
India
Twitter: @AparajitaRay
LinkedIn:
http://in.linkedin.com/pub/aparajita-ray/14/287/b42
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Aparajita Ray is Urban Infrastructure Correspondent at The Times of India. She has been covering urban infrastructure for about four and a half years, particularly the urban transport and power sector and has also covered many stories that delve deep into social issues. 

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Abashi Shamamba
L'Economiste 
Morocco
 

 

Abashi Shamamba has worked at L'Economiste for 19 years. He is currently head of the economy desk. He manages the International economy and macro-economy section of six journalists. Shamaba is also responsible for coordinating the journal’s quality policy. Holder of an award from ENA in Rabat, he holds a degree in business economics from Hassan II University in Casablanca, and an award from ENA, Rabat. Abashi Shamamba is originally from the Democratic Republic of Congo. 

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Emily Stewart
The Business, ABC
Australia
Twitter: @stewart_emily

Emily Stewart has been a reporter with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, the national broadcaster, since 2008. She has been the Melbourne reporter for The Business program, a national business, economics and finance television show, since 2010. She has covered a wide range of transport issues including public private partnerships, shipping industry reforms and biofuel in the aviation industry. 

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Google is searching for billion dollar ideas with the X-factor
ABC (Australia) | 28 July 2015

 

 

Dai Tian
China Daily
China  
 

Dai Tian has been a business reporter with China Daily, the national English media group, since 2014, writing exclusive stories ranging from cross-border trades to company profiles. Prior to that, she worked as a Hong Kong-based reporter with Caixin media, covering financial markets and corporate news.

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Describe your vision for your country’s transport future?
-A full-fledged high-speed train network connecting all major cities in China, increasing mobility for business and travel
-Improved highways and other infrastructures to assist e-commerce trade between urban and less developed regions
-More convenient and diversified ways of cross-continent transport, as enabled by the revitalization of the Silk Road and the new Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank

What transport initiatives/projects in your country would you like to share?
China has been seeking co-operation with countries along the Silk Road Economic Belt and the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road, promoting mutual development in economics and transport infrastructures.  As China unveiled the framework and new routes of its Belt and Road initiatives in April, infrastructural projects will likely to kick off along with multilateral trade promotions.

What should policy makers focus on, in your country/globally?
Policy makers should encourage private sectors to fully participate in the Silk Belt and Road initiatives and allow market forces to play a decisive role. This is in line with the government’s determination to improve investment efficiency and uphold high-quality growth.

 

 

 

 

İbrahim Türkmen
Today’s Zaman / Aksiyon Turkey
Twitter: @pesemitt

 

Ibrahim Turkmen is Senior correspondent and business editor of Today's Zaman and in 2014 was also appointed business editor of Aksiyon magazine, the largest weekly news magazine in Turkey. In 2007 he was a member of the team who built Today's Zaman, and in 2010 he assumed the responsibility of coordinating the publication of ZAman groups weekly papers in the US and Britain. Ibrahim studied Economics and International Relations at the Bilgi University in İstanbul and graduated in 2001.  He spent more than a year as a Treasury expert at a private bank and then moved to journalism.  

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What are the challenges facing transport in your country?
- Too much reliance on land transport, failure to tap the vast potential in maritime and railway transport effectively.
- Extremely expensive fuel and heavy tax burdens.
- Externalities on transport companies arising from the political problems with countries in the region, the latest example of which is the unilateral suspension of the RoRo agreement with Egypt.

Describe your vision for your country’s transport future?
- To become a part of a great network of transport spanning from China to the westernmost edge of Europe, hence ensuring the utilisation of trade opportunities such a vision promises,

What are you best and worst travel experiences?
- Best: A domestic trip across Anatolia.
- Worst: A mess in ticket records on a way back to Turkey from the US.

 

 

 

Richard Willingham
The Age
Australia
Twitter: @rwillingham

Richard Willingham is State Political Correspondent with Melbourne Age, where he has worked since 2010.  He has a strong interest in major infrastructure projects, including debate between road and rail, which have become critical issues in Australian politics, particularly at a state level.

He has covered a wide-range of issues including industrial relations, gambling, infrastructure, emergency services as well as the daily grind of politics.  

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What are the challenges facing transport in your country?
- Building road and rail projects in expanding cities and how best to connect Australia’s major cities over such vast distances.
- How to fund major infrastructure projects

What transport initiatives/projects in your country would you like to share?
In my home state, Victoria, a new government ripped up contracts for a new road tunnel. The issue of the East West Tunnel and how Australia decides what projects to fund and build has become highly political, with demands for transparency over the benefits of projects.

What should policy makers focus on, in your country/globally?
Sustainability and effective use of infrastructure, including building major projects as a tool to boost the economy and employment.

 

 

Ye  Zhang
Global Times 
China
Twitter: @ZhangYolanda

Ye  Zhang  has been working as a business reporter at the Global Times since 2012, covering stories of businesses in different industries such as e-commerce, transportation, consumer products, logistics, and macro-economy.

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What are the challenges facing transport in your country?
More cities in China are confronted with traffic  congestion issues, as increasing numbers  of Chinese households own at least one car. And how to optimise the transportation system during Spring Festival travel is also a problem for the Chinese government. As for shipping companies, they are suffering from overcapacity amid economic slowdown.

What transport initiatives/projects in your country would you like to share?
China is actively pushing the One Belt One Road initiatives, which is expected to spur trading and communications between China and other countries and regions around the world. But the prospect s of the initiatives depend on how much support  China can gain from governments and individuals in other countries.

What should policy makers focus on, in your country/globally?
Chinese policy makers need put more focus on how to ease city transport  pressure via Internet. Car-sharing is becoming a trend, but China still has yet to map out any specific  and clear regulations for the sector.  Smart transport, an important  aspect of smart cities, is also a field that should be addressed with great importance.